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Posts Tagged ‘Chief Cameron McLay’

“Should Stop-And-Frisk Be In Play In PGH in 2015?” “Absolutely.”

In Video on January 19, 2015 at 2:22 pm
Stop And Frisk debate

Conservative commentator and community activist Lenny McAllister (host, “NightTalk: Get to the Point”) and new Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay debate the application of “Stop-and-Frisk” tactics in the City of Pittsburgh during an exchange on the January 9th episode.

PITTSBURGH (January 9, 2015): Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay and political commentator Lenny McAllister (host, “NightTalk: Get To The Point Panel”) get into a debate concerning the use of Stop-And-Frisk tactics in the City of Pittsburgh in 2015 despite its controversial application against communities of color.

 

The GTTP Panel also includes local NOBLE Chapter president Greg Rogers and Dr. Waverly Duck of the University of Pittsburgh’s Center on Race and Social Problems.

 

Catch parts of the discussion with McLay, Rogers, Duck, and McAllister by clicking the picture above or clicking HERE

 

 

A Reply from “The Community” to New Pittsburgh Police Chief

In Articles on December 26, 2014 at 12:56 am
New Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay tells "the community" in his recent "open letter to the community": “Here in Pittsburgh, we too have had our incidents, and the public trust is in jeopardy. If we, the police, are to regain legitimacy, we must assure those calling for change that we hear and understand them, and are committed to police accountability...and, in the process, demonstrate to our communities of color that we hear and understand the pain..."

New Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay tells “the community” in his recent “open letter to the community”:
“Here in Pittsburgh, we too have had our incidents, and the public trust is in jeopardy. If we, the police, are to regain legitimacy, we must assure those calling for change that we hear and understand them, and are committed to police accountability…and, in the process, demonstrate to our communities of color that we hear and understand the pain…”

Pittsburgh (December 25, 2014)  – Pittsburgh-born urban-based advocate and current Pittsburgh boomerang Lenny McAllister published “An Open Letter to Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay”, a response to McLay’s “An Open Letter to the Community” published originally in The New Pittsburgh Courier earlier in the week.

 

McLay’s letter, coming on the heels of Christmas, denotes the reassignment of Officer David Derbish to desk duty after several protests led by supporters of Leon Ford, Jr. demanding the firing of Derbish as well as an investigation by the Department of Justice into the 2012 shooting of Ford by Derbish after 3 Pittsburgh police officers broke several police procedures during a mangled traffic stop.

 

Now the question remains,” McLay apparently asks Pittsburgh’s African-American community in the letter. “What are we going to do, Pittsburgh? Police work is often not pretty. Officers must arrest violators. Violators often resist, sometimes violently. When the next ugly incident happens, will we be willing to withhold judgment and control our emotions long enough to give each other the benefit of the doubt? Are we going to work together toward reconciliation? Are we going to work on listening to one another with the intention of compassionate understanding?”

 

Understandably, our appreciation and respect become challenged when we collectively put too much pressure on ‘the community’ to change its ways without calling for and overseeing appropriate, holistic, and long-term actions of accountability by those with the capabilities to enforce laws, ensure ethics, and commit traumatic and life-ending acts within the blink of an eye,” McAllister writes in his reply as a member of “the community”. “Compassionate understanding comes from the acknowledgment that pain forecasts an issue that must be remedied immediately and properly so that discomfort can subside and dysfunction can cease. Sir, it is of the utmost importance that the discomfort currently felt throughout America (particularly within police bureaus such as ours here in Pittsburgh) is remedied alongside the underlying dysfunction simultaneously lest the pain continue and the problems remain…burdens involved in police-community interactions uniquely entail irreversible consequences that occur in lightning-quick moments – thus prompting immediate remedy.”

 
McAllister’s full reply can be found HERE.

 

McLay’s “Open Letter” can be found HERE.